When Do Consumers Compromise on Calories? Exploring the Attraction and Compromise Effects in Food Choice

Prior research has shown that the provision of calorie information on menus leads to changes in consumer choice (e.g., Howlett et al. 2009). We explore whether the attraction and compromise effect occur when consumers are presented with calorie information on menus.



Citation:

Ryall Carroll and Beth Valen (2012) ,"When Do Consumers Compromise on Calories? Exploring the Attraction and Compromise Effects in Food Choice ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1107-1107.

Authors

Ryall Carroll, St. John's University, USA
Beth Valen, Fordham University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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