Is More Always Better? Examining the Effects of Highly Attentive Service

This paper investigates the highly attentive service paradox using affect-based satisfaction model. Based on three studies, we find that three affective factors—warmth, pressure and sadness/anger—mediate the relationship between service attentiveness and customer satisfaction. We also find that affect and disconfirmation play different roles in terms of initial expectations.



Citation:

Maggie Wenjing Liu, Hean Tat Keh, and Zhijun Zhang (2012) ,"Is More Always Better? Examining the Effects of Highly Attentive Service ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 595-597.

Authors

Maggie Wenjing Liu, Tsinghua University, China
Hean Tat Keh, Queensland University,Australia
Zhijun Zhang, Beijing University, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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