Reconstructing Time: Do the Parts Add Up to the Whole?

Extant research in time perceptions consistently offers a “discrete explanation” for misestimating time: longer duration judgements are associated with more interval-filling information being recalled from memory and vice versa. Using a 2x3 experimental design, this study finds evidence to advance an “event-partonomy explanation”. Compared to a bottom-up reconstruction, individuals who are cued to perform a top-down reconstruction produced shorter duration estimates. This effect was enhanced by memory decay. Moreover, given a series of segments which collectively make up a whole event “the sum of the parts is greater than the whole”, which is also enhanced by memory decay.



Citation:

Sonia Vilches-Montero and Mark Spence (2012) ,"Reconstructing Time: Do the Parts Add Up to the Whole?", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10, eds. , , and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 296-298.

Authors

Sonia Vilches-Montero, Faculty of Business, Bond University and Universidad Catolica de la Santisima Concepcion, Chile
Mark Spence, Bond University, Australia.



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10 | 2012



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