Consuming the Aesthetic of the Everyday: a Visual Analysis of Errol Morris’ “High Life”.

Co-constructed meaning between marketer and consumer is a key dimension of convergent (Jenkins 2006) media. Using “Miller’s High Life” ads (1999-2005) we discuss how content convergence prompts different co-constructed meanings among consumers, how advertising as “mundane art” is produced and how the marketer/consumer relationship is transformed into a filmmaker/viewer-consumer one. From an interdisciplinary perspective, we discuss the implications of this transformed relationship for marketing.



Citation:

Helene de Burgh-Woodman and Cathie Payne (2012) ,"Consuming the Aesthetic of the Everyday: a Visual Analysis of Errol Morris’ “High Life”.", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10, eds. , , and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 51-60.

Authors

Helene de Burgh-Woodman, University of Notre Dame, Australia
Cathie Payne, University of Newcastle, Australia



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10 | 2012



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