Brand Suicide?: Memory and Liking of Negative Brand Names

Brand names can convey important attributes of a product, and can more generally impact the brand image itself. For instance, brand names such as Dove and Apple implicitly convey positivity. However, some products are marketed with distinctly negative brand names, such as Burn energy drink, Fat Bastard chardonnay, and Poison perfume. What are the consequences of such negative brand names for consumer behavior? Might they bestow certain benefits that outweigh their negative connotations? We report two experiments that investigate this question.



Citation:

Duncan Guest, Zachary Estes, Michael Gibbert, and David Mazursky (2011) ,"Brand Suicide?: Memory and Liking of Negative Brand Names", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 903-904.

Authors

Duncan Guest, Lugano University, Switzerland
Zachary Estes, University of Warwick, UK
Michael Gibbert, Lugano Universty, Switzerland
David Mazursky, Hebrew University, Israel



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Dimming the Light Offers A Creative Lens: The Impact of Ambient Illuminance on Creativity Assessment

Chen Wang, Drexel University, USA
Ravi Mehta, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business, China
Jennifer Argo, University of Alberta, Canada

Read More

Featured

Influence of Visual Crowding and Space Between Products on Consumer Choice

Ana Scekic, HEC Paris, France
Selin Atalay, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management, Germany
Cathy Liu Yang, HEC Paris, France
Peter Ebbes, HEC Paris, France

Read More

Featured

Brands as Complex Social Processes

Andrea Hemetsberger, University of Innsbruck, Austria
Hans Mühlbacher, International University of Monaco
Eric J Arnould, Aalto University, Finland

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.