Ideal Affect As a Basis of Judgment in Experiential and Material Purchases

The present research examines the role of ideal affect, the affective states people would like to feel, as a basis of judgment in experiential and material purchases. We hypothesize that ideal affect may play a more central role in experiential purchases than in material purchases because affective experiences consumers pursue from decisions would be more closely related to experiential purchases than to material purchases. In purchasing situations where participants were asked to buy products or services for themselves, people were likely to choose options which correspond to their own ideal affect in experiential purchases but not in material purchases (Study 1). On the other hand, when participants were asked to make decisions for other people, people made choices based on ideal affect for others in both of experiential and material purchases although they made more choices reflecting ideal affect for others in experiential purchases than in material purchases (Study 2). In sum, the overall results of the present research suggest that people are more likely to employ the affective factor as a basis of judgment and make decisions relied on it especially when engaging in experiential purchases.



Citation:

Yoon Ji Shim and Incheol Choi (2011) ,"Ideal Affect As a Basis of Judgment in Experiential and Material Purchases", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 891-892.

Authors

Yoon Ji Shim, Seoul National University, South Korea
Incheol Choi, Seoul National University, South Korea



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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