Is Negative Brand Publicity Always Damaging?: the Moderating Role of Power

In three studies we demonstrate how a consumer's power influences their response to negative brand information. Power affects how consumers weight external information, high power people place less weight on external information than do low power people. Using source credibility and thought confidence manipulations we are able to demonstrate that the weight that consumers attach to negative information is dependent upon power, and this in turn influences brand evaluations.



Citation:

David Norton, Alokparna Monga, and William Bearden (2011) ,"Is Negative Brand Publicity Always Damaging?: the Moderating Role of Power", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 857-858.

Authors

David Norton, University of South Carolina, USA
Alokparna Monga, University of South Carolina, USA
William Bearden, University of South Carolina, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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