When Recall Disrupts Memory: Evidence For Implicit Reference Prices

Are memory-based price comparisons more accurate when participants rely on implicit or explicit memory? Results from two studies suggest that participants who made judgments without explicitly recalling reference prices were more accurate than those who tried to do so. Thus, consumers can rely on implicit reference prices for magnitude judgments.



Citation:

Manoj Thomas and Ellie Kyung (2011) ,"When Recall Disrupts Memory: Evidence For Implicit Reference Prices", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 251.

Authors

Manoj Thomas, Cornell University, USA
Ellie Kyung, Dartmouth College, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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