Reversing Ease of Retrieval Effects With Sensory Product Experience

Contrary to previous ease-of-retrieval findings, we find that after a sensory product experience, generating more reasons why individuals liked (disliked) the product results in more (less) favorable evaluations of the product than generating fewer reasons. These effects were obtained under both high-and-low involvement conditions and were not due to the content of reasons.



Citation:

Kelly (Kiyeon) Lee and Andrew Mitchell (2011) ,"Reversing Ease of Retrieval Effects With Sensory Product Experience", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 620-621.

Authors

Kelly (Kiyeon) Lee, University of Toronto, Canada
Andrew Mitchell, University of Toronto, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Don’t Tell Me Who I Am! When and How Assigning Consumers an Identity Backfires

Noah Castelo, Columbia University, USA
Kirk Kristofferson, Ivey Business School
Kelley Main, University of Manitoba, Canada
Katherine White, University of British Columbia, Canada

Read More

Featured

Proximity Bias: Interactive Effects of Event Valence and Event Nearness on Probability Estimates

Jennifer Seok Hwa Hong, New York University, USA
Chiara Longoni, Boston University, USA
Vicki G. Morwitz, New York University, USA

Read More

Featured

Rejecting Moralized Products: Moral Identity as a Predictor of Reactance to “Vegetarian” and “Sustainable” Labels

Rishad Habib, University of British Columbia, Canada
Yann Cornil, University of British Columbia, Canada
Karl Aquino, University of British Columbia, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.