That’S Not How I Remember It: Willfully Ignorant Memory For Ethical Product Attribute Information

Across three studies we demonstrate that consumers respond to information that a product performs poorly on an ethical attribute by using willfully ignorant memory, a self-protection mechanism in which they are more likely to misremember poor performance on an ethical attribute than positive performance on an ethical attribute.



Citation:

Rebecca Naylor, Julie R. Irwin, and Kristine Ehrich (2011) ,"That’S Not How I Remember It: Willfully Ignorant Memory For Ethical Product Attribute Information ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 230-231.

Authors

Rebecca Naylor, The Ohio State University, USA
Julie R. Irwin, The University of Texas at Austin, USA
Kristine Ehrich, University of San Diego, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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