I Didn’T Think I Would Like What You Chose For Me: Relationship Norms and Satisfaction With Consumer- Versus Provider-Chosen Outcomes

Four studies examine the moderating influence of exchange and communal relationships on satisfaction with self- versus provider-chosen outcomes. Exchange norms suggest self-interest while communal norms suggest concern for others: consumers expect lower satisfaction in exchange compared to communal relationships. Subsequent expectation disconfirmation and confirmation reverses the effect for actual satisfaction.



Citation:

Pankaj Aggarwal, Simona Botti, and Ann McGill (2011) ,"I Didn’T Think I Would Like What You Chose For Me: Relationship Norms and Satisfaction With Consumer- Versus Provider-Chosen Outcomes", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 219-220.

Authors

Pankaj Aggarwal, University of Toronto, Canada
Simona Botti, London Business School, UK
Ann McGill, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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