Strategic Self-Presentation in Joint Consumption: Stereotypes As Social Tools

When making joint consumption decisions, consumers may rely on stereotypes to infer the preferences of people they are unfamiliar with. We demonstrate that high self-monitors relative to low self-monitors are more adept at determining when it may or may not be appropriate to select items consistent with their stereotypical assumptions.



Citation:

Linyun Yang, Tanya Chartrand, and Gavan Fitzsimons (2011) ,"Strategic Self-Presentation in Joint Consumption: Stereotypes As Social Tools", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 218-219.

Authors

Linyun Yang, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, USA
Tanya Chartrand, Duke University, USA
Gavan Fitzsimons, Duke University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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