Moral Compensation and the Environment: Affecting Individuals’ Moral Intentions Through How They See Themselves As Moral

Across two studies, we find that having people engage in extreme, but not moderate, moral recalls leads to compensatory environment-related moral behavior. We propose that this effect is due to the ability of extreme moral behavior to alter individuals’ moral self-images and hence their desires to alter these states via moral behavior.



Citation:

Jennifer Jordan, Francesca Gino, Ann Tenbrunsel, and Marijke Leliveld (2011) ,"Moral Compensation and the Environment: Affecting Individuals’ Moral Intentions Through How They See Themselves As Moral ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 196-197.

Authors

Jennifer Jordan, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Francesca Gino, Harvard Business School, USA
Ann Tenbrunsel, University of Notre Dame, USA
Marijke Leliveld, University of Groningen, The Netherlands



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Inequality and Market (In)efficiency

Serena Hagerty, Harvard Business School, USA
Michael Norton, Harvard Business School, USA

Read More

Featured

Emotion, Scientific Reasoning, and Judgments of Scientific Evidence

Caitlin Drummond, University of Michigan, USA
Baruch Fischhoff, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Read More

Featured

J11. The Myth of Return – Success or Failure? Consumer Identity and Belonging in the Case of Repatriate Migrants

Sonja N. Kralj, University of Augsburg, Germany
Michael Paul, University of Augsburg, Germany

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.