Objectification and Consumer Choice

Prior research has found that one of the most prominently imposed values and beliefs from the media has been the objectified view of the human body, and more specifically, the female body. We examine the effects of objectification on consumer decisions. Findings indicate that objectification affects female (but not male) consumers’ decisions.



Citation:

Chrissy Mitakakis, Sankar Sen, and Stephen Gould (2011) ,"Objectification and Consumer Choice", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 815-816.

Authors

Chrissy Mitakakis, Baruch College, USA
Sankar Sen, Baruch College, USA
Stephen Gould, Baruch College, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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