To Relate Or Not to Relate?: How Feature Relatedness Contributes to Product Value

The present research examines the effects of differing consumption goals on product value. Consumption goals are the benefits consumers seek in a consumption context and may differ according to dimensions such as (1) hedonic–utilitarian (i.e., whether a product offers experiential or functional benefits) and (2) feature relatedness (i.e., whether or not a new features offers benefits related to a product’s core feature/functionality). The results show that, when adding new features to existing products, both related (as opposed to unrelated) and hedonic (as opposed to utilitarian) new features contribute to product value. More specifically, hedonic-new features increase product value, even when unrelated; however, utilitarian-new features increase product value only when they are related to a product’s core feature.



Citation:

Valentin Gattol, Maria Sääksjärvi, Tripat Gill, and Jan P. L. Schoormans (2011) ,"To Relate Or Not to Relate?: How Feature Relatedness Contributes to Product Value", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 804-805.

Authors

Valentin Gattol, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Maria Sääksjärvi, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Tripat Gill, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada
Jan P. L. Schoormans, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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