The Content of a Brand Scandal Moderating the Effect of Thinking Style on the Scandal’S Spillover

We propose that different types of brand scandals moderate the effects of thinking styles on scandals’ spillover. Across three studies, we demonstrate that holistic thinkers are more susceptible to extrinsic brand scandals (i.e., related with corporate ethics/social responsibility), whereas analytic thinkers are more susceptible to intrinsic brand scandals (i.e., directly related with brand quality).



Citation:

Yun Lee, Nara Youn, and Dhananjay Nayakankuppam (2011) ,"The Content of a Brand Scandal Moderating the Effect of Thinking Style on the Scandal’S Spillover ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 523-524.

Authors

Yun Lee, University of Iowa, USA
Nara Youn, Hongik University, Korea
Dhananjay Nayakankuppam, University of Iowa, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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