Individual Differences in Interpersonal Touch: Development of the “Comfort With Interpersonal Touch” Scale

This research details the development of the ‘Comfort with Interpersonal Touch’ (CIT) scale designed to measure individual differences in interpersonal touch tendencies and preferences. We propose five underlying dimensions that influence perceptions of touch: source, relationship, gender, type, and context. Preliminary studies have been conducted to further our scale development. This scale promotes research that informs business negotiation and persuasion across varying individuals and cultures.



Citation:

Joann Peck and Andrea Webb (2011) ,"Individual Differences in Interpersonal Touch: Development of the “Comfort With Interpersonal Touch” Scale", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 771-772.

Authors

Joann Peck, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Andrea Webb, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

I9. From Childhood Toys to Grownup Choices: Understanding the Gendered Appeal of Violent Media

Martin A. Pyle, Ryerson University

Read More

Featured

A Salience Theory of Three Novel Exposure Effects

Kellen Mrkva, Columbia University, USA
Leaf Van Boven, University of Colorado, USA

Read More

Featured

N10. How Does It Make You Feel? Emotional Reasoning and Consumer Decisions

Andrea Rochelle Bennett, University of North Texas
Blair Kidwell, University of North Texas
Jonathan Hasford, University of Central Florida, USA
David Hardesty, University of Kentucky, USA
Molly Burchett, University of Kentucky, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.