Affect, Cognition, and Consumer Charity: the Moderating Role of Social Distance

This paper demonstrates that affect and cognition interact with social distance between donor and recipient, resulting in differences in donation. Affect-driven donors are motivated by a consummatory goal of increasing “warm glow” utility, which occurs irrespective of social distance. However, cognition-driven donors are motivated by an instrumental goal of donating to a cause from which they derive utility, which is lessened by increasing social distance. Three experiments show support for the processing mode by social distance interaction. In the third experiment, a novel donation of extra credit points by student participants (time) results in similar effects as donation of money.



Citation:

Joseph Paniculangara and Xin He (2011) ,"Affect, Cognition, and Consumer Charity: the Moderating Role of Social Distance", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 773-774.

Authors

Joseph Paniculangara, University of Central Florida, USA
Xin He, University of Central Florida, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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