Effect of Character Weight and Health Knowledge on Children's Eating

This research investigates (1) the influence of overweight priming on children across developmental stages, and (2) whether children have the cognitive ability to use health knowledge to reduce these effects. Three experiments demonstrate that overweight characters increase eating in children, and developmental differences in using health knowledge as a moderator.



Citation:

Margaret C. Campbell, Kenneth C. Manning, Bridget Leonard, and Hannah Manning (2011) ,"Effect of Character Weight and Health Knowledge on Children's Eating", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 105-106.

Authors

Margaret C. Campbell, University of Colorado, USA
Kenneth C. Manning, Colorado State University, USA
Bridget Leonard, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA
Hannah Manning, Rocky Mountain High School, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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