Unrelated Variety: When Greater Dissimilarity Can Increase Satiation

Against prevailing notions that more similar stimuli are more satiating, we find making two seemingly unrelated stimuli appear similar reduces satiation. This effect is shown for both food and music, and mediation evidence shows framing highly dissimilar stimuli into a single category increases perceptions of variety and slows satiation.



Citation:

Jannine Lasaleta and Joseph Redden (2011) ,"Unrelated Variety: When Greater Dissimilarity Can Increase Satiation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 94-95.

Authors

Jannine Lasaleta, University of Minnesota, USA
Joseph Redden, University of Minnesota, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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