Mixed Signals: the Impact of Partitioning on Consumption

Whereas some research finds that partitioning a set of items increases consumption, other research finds that partitions decrease consumption. What explains these conflicting findings? We propose that partitions serve both as signals of variety and as decision points in influencing consumption and identify factors that determine the direction of influence.



Citation:

Jordan Etkin and Rebecca K. Ratner (2011) ,"Mixed Signals: the Impact of Partitioning on Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 93-94.

Authors

Jordan Etkin, University of Maryland, USA
Rebecca K. Ratner, University of Maryland, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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