Interpersonal Implications of Self-Licensing

Research has demonstrated that feeling virtuous subsequently licenses people to behave in less-than-virtuous ways. We examine how feeling virtuous influences people’s judgments of others. Three studies show that people who believe they are virtuous lower the standards and demands of virtue for themselves, yet raise the demands for others.



Citation:

Evan Polman and Uzma Khan (2011) ,"Interpersonal Implications of Self-Licensing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 82-83.

Authors

Evan Polman, Cornell University, USA
Uzma Khan, Stanford University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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