The Effects of Brand Translations and Their Cultural Symbolisms on Brand Evaluation Among Young Chinese Consumers

Young Chinese consumers are more likely to infer individual autonomy values from phonetic/ phonosemantic translations of Western brand names than from semantic translations, particularly for value-expressive products. Because phonosemantic translations also create favorable impressions of cultural sensitivity, they are the most favorably evaluated. Self-relevance of autonomy values moderates the effects.



Citation:

Hean Tat Keh, Carlos Torelli, Jessie Hao, and Chi-yue Chiu (2011) ,"The Effects of Brand Translations and Their Cultural Symbolisms on Brand Evaluation Among Young Chinese Consumers", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 70-71.

Authors

Hean Tat Keh, The University of Queensland, Australia
Carlos Torelli, University of Minnesota, USA
Jessie Hao, Guang Dong University of Foreign Studies, China
Chi-yue Chiu, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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