Sins of Omission and Sins of Commission: Differences in Brand-Switching Intentions Due to Culturally Different Theories of Agency

Unsatisfactory product experience due to an individual’s (vs. a group’s) action induces greater brand-switching intentions among Easterners. Conversely, unsatisfactory product experience due to an individual’s (vs. a group’s) failure to act induces greater brand-switching intentions among Westerners. Counterfactual thinking has been found to mediate this, indicating cross-culturally different agency perceptions.



Citation:

Sharon Ng, Hakkyun Kim, and Akshay R. Rao (2011) ,"Sins of Omission and Sins of Commission: Differences in Brand-Switching Intentions Due to Culturally Different Theories of Agency", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 69-70.

Authors

Sharon Ng, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Hakkyun Kim, Concordia University, Canada
Akshay R. Rao, University of Minnesota, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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