The Impact of Emotion on Color Preference: Evidence of Affective Fit

We demonstrate that the evaluation of an affective target is governed neither solely by a person’s affective state nor solely by the affective tone of a target but by their affective fit: happiness (sadness) increased preferences for happy (sad) colors.



Citation:

Chan Jean Lee and Eduardo Andrade (2011) ,"The Impact of Emotion on Color Preference: Evidence of Affective Fit", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 59-60.

Authors

Chan Jean Lee, UC Berkeley, USA
Eduardo Andrade, UC Berkeley, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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