The Effect of Large Incentives on Optimistic Responding: Evidence That Optimism Is Real

Optimistic responding is not just cheap talk. NFL fans predicted a game involving their favorite team or not for small ($5) or large ($50) accuracy incentives. Even when accuracy incentives were large, fans were more likely than neutral participants to predict their favorite team to win.



Citation:

Joseph P. Simmons and Cade Massey (2011) ,"The Effect of Large Incentives on Optimistic Responding: Evidence That Optimism Is Real", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 48-49.

Authors

Joseph P. Simmons, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Cade Massey, Yale University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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