Is More Always Better? Examining the Effects of Highly Attentive Service

The present research investigates the highly attentive service paradox using the affect-based satisfaction model. Based on a qualitative study and two experiments, we find that three affective factors—warmth (positive affect), pressure (negative affect) and sadness/anger (negative affect)—mediate the relationship between service attentiveness and customer satisfaction. We also find that affect and disconfirmation play different roles in satisfaction formation in terms of initial expectations. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings and suggest future research directions.



Citation:

Hean Tat Keh, Maggie Wenjing Liu, and Lijun Zhang (2011) ,"Is More Always Better? Examining the Effects of Highly Attentive Service ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 722-724.

Authors

Hean Tat Keh, Beijing University, China
Maggie Wenjing Liu, Tsinghua University, China
Lijun Zhang, Beijing University, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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