The Persuasive Power of Contradicting Oneself

Conventional wisdom suggests that contradicting oneself, or delivering conflicting messages, should undermine one’s persuasiveness. In contrast to this view, we find that under some conditions contradictions/conflicting messages promote rather than inhibit persuasion. Three experiments explore the boundaries conditions and mechanism for this effect.



Citation:

Taly Reich and Zakary L. Tormala (2011) ,"The Persuasive Power of Contradicting Oneself", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 24.

Authors

Taly Reich , Stanford University, USA
Zakary L. Tormala, Stanford University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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