Linguistic Mimicry in Online Word of Mouth

We introduce the concept of linguistic mimicry to consumer research and examine its effect on online word of mouth. We use experimental data and field data from online forums to identify 1) social antecedents (e.g., length of time belonging to forum, information disclosure) and 2) consequences (e.g., frequency posting) of linguistic mimicry.



Citation:

Sarah Moore and Brent McFerran (2011) ,"Linguistic Mimicry in Online Word of Mouth", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 18-19.

Authors

Sarah Moore, University of Alberta, Canada
Brent McFerran, University of Michigan, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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