Economic Recessions Increase Spending on Beauty Products: Experimental Evidence For the Lipstick Effect

Although spending typically declines in economic recessions, some observers have noted that recessions may increase spending on beauty products – dubbed the Lipstick Effect. Across experiments that manipulate recession cues, we show that while recession cues decrease desire for most products, recession cues increase women’s desire for beauty products.



Citation:

Sarah Hill, Christopher Rodeheffer, Vladas Griskevicius, and Kristina Durante (2011) ,"Economic Recessions Increase Spending on Beauty Products: Experimental Evidence For the Lipstick Effect ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 7_8.

Authors

Sarah Hill, Texas Christian University, USA
Christopher Rodeheffer, Texas Christian University, USA
Vladas Griskevicius, University of Minnesota, USA
Kristina Durante, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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