The Sacred and the Profane in Islamic Consumption

This paper examines the concept of material consumption culture in the Moslem world. It differentiates between institutionalized religion and religion as culture, contests the portrayal of Islam as a dogmatic ideological system, and concludes that in their profane consumption practices, Moslems interpret the sacred (Islamic guidelines) in multiple ways.



Citation:

Aliakbar Jafari and Ahmet Suerdem (2011) ,"The Sacred and the Profane in Islamic Consumption ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39, eds. Rohini Ahluwalia, Tanya L. Chartrand, and Rebecca K. Ratner, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 427-429.

Authors

Aliakbar Jafari, University of Strathclyde, UK
Ahmet Suerdem, Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 39 | 2011



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