Mere Influence Effect: When Motivation to Influence Drives Decision

We propose that people are motivated to influence, and to show their control over, the environment around them. This motivation to be influential, independent of hedonic consideration of the choice options, systematically affect decision making. In four studies, in the contexts of actual presidential elections, charitable giving of real consequences, and program evaluations, we find strong support for this mere influence effect.



Citation:

Xianchi Dai, Leilei Gao, and Baba Shiv (2011) ,"Mere Influence Effect: When Motivation to Influence Drives Decision", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Zhihong Yi, Jing Jian Xiao, and June Cotte and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 14-15.

Authors

Xianchi Dai, Chinese University of Hong Kong
Leilei Gao, Chinese University of Hong Kong
Baba Shiv, Stanford University, USA



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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