Social Media As an Institutional Supplement to Consumer Rights Protection: a Qualitative Study Based on Sanlu Scandal in China

China as an emerging market has manifested its deficiencies in the areas of legislation and regulation. In many cases, Chinese consumers seem to be powerless. This paper focuses on consumer rights protection by examining the role of social media as an institutional supplement. Based on online observations, we analyze the case of Sanlu Scandal to demonstrate the role of social media as a platform to express the will of people. We demonstrate how social media may change the power relationships in a network of companies, consumers and governments. We conclude that consumers are more and more likely to rely on social media to express their voice and protect their own rights when other means protection are lacking.



Citation:

Xiucheng Fan, Ting Ting Zhao, and Pia Polsa (2011) ,"Social Media As an Institutional Supplement to Consumer Rights Protection: a Qualitative Study Based on Sanlu Scandal in China", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Zhihong Yi, Jing Jian Xiao, and June Cotte and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 174-175.

Authors

Xiucheng Fan, Fudan University, China
Ting Ting Zhao, Fudan University, China
Pia Polsa, HANKEN School of Economics



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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