Attaining Satisfaction

It is self-evident that performing poorly on a task makes people dissatisfied relative to performing well. How can this negative affect be overcome? We provide an adaptive strategy for dealing with poor performance. Experiment 1 shows that poor performers tend to recruit the highest potential performance as a comparison standard and hence, are dissatisfied. However, if they are reminded that they set their own low goals and that these goals were met, they are as satisfied as better performers. Experiment 2 shows that incremental theorists who believe that they can improve their performance in the future tend to compare their performance to the initially set goal rather than the highest potential performance, and are hence as satisfied better performers. Implications of these findings for perennial low goal setters are discussed.



Citation:

Cecile Cho and Gita Johar (2011) ,"Attaining Satisfaction", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Zhihong Yi, Jing Jian Xiao, and June Cotte and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Cecile Cho, University of California Riverside, Anderson Graduate School of Management, USA
Gita Johar, Columbia University, USA



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

B4. Prestige is the Truth: Luxury Branding Drives for Fairness Perception of Non-physical Attribute Based Dynamic Pricing

Edward Yuhang Lai, Virginia Tech, USA
Cindy Yoonjoung Heo, Ecole hôtelière de Lausanne

Read More

Featured

Perceptions of Epistemic vs. Aleatory Uncertainty Affect Stock Investment

Daniel Walters, INSEAD, France
Gulden Ulkumen, University of Southern California, USA
Carsten Erner, FS Card
David Tannebaum, University of Utah, USA
Craig Fox, University of California Los Angeles, USA

Read More

Featured

Stigma at Every Turn: Exploring Bi+ Consumer Experiences

Abigail Jean Nappier Cherup, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Andre F. Maciel, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.