Of Losing a Parent and Buying a Bmw: the Effects of Mortality Salience Regarding a Loved One on Materialistic Consumption

This article explores the effect of mortality salience regarding a loved one (MSLO) on materialism. Supported by self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), we bring forward loss management theory (LMT), which claims that permanent separation anxiety aroused by MSLO motivates individuals to build a goal system centred on intrinsic values. Consequently, MSLO diminishes one’s desire for materialistic consumption. Through four lab experiments, participants in the MSLO condition were found less materialistic compared to those in control condition and product frame moderated this effect. The comparison between LMT and Terror Management Theory (TMT) is provided at the end of the essay.



Citation:

Yanan Wang and Ulf Bockenholt (2011) ,"Of Losing a Parent and Buying a Bmw: the Effects of Mortality Salience Regarding a Loved One on Materialistic Consumption", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Zhihong Yi, Jing Jian Xiao, and June Cotte and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 223-224.

Authors

Yanan Wang, McGill University
Ulf Bockenholt, Northwestern University



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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