The Consumption Implications of Contested Community

This study examines heterogeneity of membership and brands within subcultures of consumption. Previous work has glossed over three theoretical issues related to consumption communities: (1) differences between brand communities and subcultures of consumption, (2) presence of multiple brands within communities, and (3) heterogeneity within each community. We engage in a detailed analysis of subcultures of consumption, embracing the previously neglected theoretical issues. Our findings demonstrate that heterogeneity within the community results in a contested community characterized by multiple incommensurate discourses in evidence both within and between segments of the community. These disparate discourses are fueled by and linked to marketing resources.



Citation:

Tandy Thomas, Hope Schau, and Linda Price (2011) ,"The Consumption Implications of Contested Community", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 13-14.

Authors

Tandy Thomas, Queens University
Hope Schau, University of Arizona, USA
Linda Price, University of Arizona, USA



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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