Product Information Presented As Ratios and the Role of Consumer Processing Mode: Can Analytical Processing Lead to More Biased Judgments For Certain Ratio Formats?

Consumers often encounter information in ratio formats, such as detergent usage information in "loads per container" (LPC) or exercise routine information in "calories burned per minute" (CPM). The results of three experiments reveal how such ratio formats can influence consumer judgments while computing averages of multiple pieces of data. The normative algorithm for computing averages of data in LPC or CPM formats is the harmonic mean, but consumers tend to compute the arithmetic mean, resulting in biased judgments. Also, paradoxically, analytical (versus heuristic) processing can accentuate inaccurate judgments. Similar paradoxical effects are observed for high (versus low) cognitive capacity.



Citation:

Dipayan Biswas, Patricia Norberg, and Donald Lehmann (2011) ,"Product Information Presented As Ratios and the Role of Consumer Processing Mode: Can Analytical Processing Lead to More Biased Judgments For Certain Ratio Formats?", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 436.

Authors

Dipayan Biswas, Bentley University, USA
Patricia Norberg, Quinnipiac University, USA
Donald Lehmann, Columbia University, USA



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Perceptions of Disability in the Marketplace: Moral Character Inferences and Persuasion

Helen van der Sluis, Arizona State University, USA
Adriana Samper, Arizona State University, USA
Kirk Kristofferson, Ivey Business School

Read More

Featured

L9. To Save Face or Follow My Heart: Salesperson’s Inquiries of In-Group Identity on Consumers’ Purchase

Lingru Wei, Tencent Holdings Limited
Jooyoung Park, Peking University

Read More

Featured

It’s About Trust: The Diffusion of Deviant Consumer Behavior

Peter Voyer, University of Windsor

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.