Brand Meaning in the Age of the Critical Reflexive Consumer: a Greimasian Semiotic Square Analysis

This is a study of how the consumer in conceptualized in the consumer resistance research. The literature in this area is reviewed and it is shown how the resistant consumer can be perceived as a critical reflexive consumer, who is dealing with the dilemma of being against consumption and at the same time living in consumer culture, where commodities are used as tools for identity construction. The dilemma of the critical reflexive consumer is analysis by using a Greimasian semiotic square and it is shown how the dilemma can be solved both by a nonprofit anti consumption organization, but also by the profit based cigarette brand.



Citation:

Per Østergaard and Judy Hermansen (2011) ,"Brand Meaning in the Age of the Critical Reflexive Consumer: a Greimasian Semiotic Square Analysis", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 441.

Authors

Per Østergaard, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
Judy Hermansen, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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