Predicting Contest Proneness and Participation

Due to increased price discounting and store brand competition in the grocery market there is resurgent interest in understanding consumers’ propensity to engage in non-price sales promotions. This study identifies the impact of consumers’ economic, hedonic and search cost motives on proneness to contest-sweepstake participation and subsequently examines whether proneness is a predictor of promotion choice. The results from a survey of 500 consumers finds that proneness is largely related to hedonic motives and that proneness is a statistically significant predictor of preference for choosing a sweepstake promotion over that of a price discount.



Citation:

Mike Reid, Peter Thompson, Felix Mavondo, and Karen Brunsø (2011) ,"Predicting Contest Proneness and Participation", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 601-602.

Authors

Mike Reid, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia
Peter Thompson, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
Felix Mavondo, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
Karen Brunsø, Aarhus School of Business, Denmark



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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