Seeking Meaning Outside the Consumer Culture

This paper provides the preliminary findings and theoretical background of research that introduces an understudied context to marketing; intentional communities (IC). A grounded theory approach is taken, where data was collected from multiple sources and here the in-depth semi-structured interviews are the main source of data reported. The research aims to understand sources of meaning outside the consumer culture. Literature within materialism and anti-consumption are explored along with the existential framework provided by Fromm (1978). Preliminary findings suggest that potential/members of IC seek an escape from consumerism as well as state of ‘being’ where interpersonal relationships and sharing source meaning.



Citation:

Itir Binay, Jan Brace-Govan, and Harmen Oppewal (2011) ,"Seeking Meaning Outside the Consumer Culture", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 596-598.

Authors

Itir Binay, Monash University, Australia
Jan Brace-Govan, Monash University, Australia
Harmen Oppewal, Monash University, Australia



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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