The Effect of Systems of Thought on Brand Scandal Spillover: Holistic Versus Analytic Cognition Moderating Scandal Spillover and Denial Effects

We propose that different systems of thought influence the likelihood of brand scandal spillover, depending on the degree to which the contents of brand scandals are processed as context-based or focal object-based information. We demonstrate that holistic thinkers are more susceptible to brand scandal spillover than analytic thinkers are when a brand scandal is not directly associated with the product itself. In contrast, analytic thinkers make more biased judgments than holistic thinkers do when a brand scandal is directly associated with the product itself.



Citation:

Yun Lee and Nara Youn (2011) ,"The Effect of Systems of Thought on Brand Scandal Spillover: Holistic Versus Analytic Cognition Moderating Scandal Spillover and Denial Effects", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 593-595.

Authors

Yun Lee, University of Iowa, USA
Nara Youn, University of Iowa, USA & Hongik University, Korea



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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