Consumption As a Tool of Cultural Resistance Against Patriarchy: the Case of First Generation Nigerian Women Living in Britain

Applying Consumer Culture Theory to acculturation and consumption we argue that first generation Nigerian women, living in Britain, actively use consumption, as a form of cultural resistance, to reassert their power in patriachical households. By interviewing British white and first generation Nigerian husband and wife we show how the latter negotiate cultural differences through consumption. In particular, the Nigerian husband’s needs to replicate a position of power and dominance in the home produces various acts of cultural resistance using consumption by their wives – sometimes explicit and other times implicit.



Citation:

Andrew Lindridge and Omnipreye Worlu (2011) ,"Consumption As a Tool of Cultural Resistance Against Patriarchy: the Case of First Generation Nigerian Women Living in Britain", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 406-411.

Authors

Andrew Lindridge, The Open University Business School, UK
Omnipreye Worlu, Manchester Business School, UK



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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