Coping With Brand Break-Ups: How Attachment Style Predicts Consumer Vengeance

Attachment styles influence a variety of interpersonal relationship behaviors. Recently, marketers have begun to examine the role of attachment styles in consumer-company interactions. We contribute to this budding research area by studying whether attachment style affects reactions to negative outcomes in consumer-company relationships, such as service failure. Evidence suggests that attachment style does predict behaviors such as complaining and that attachment style may be a useful way of understanding and predicting such consumer behavior.



Citation:

Allison R. Johnson, Matthew Thomson, and Jodie Whelan (2011) ,"Coping With Brand Break-Ups: How Attachment Style Predicts Consumer Vengeance", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 588.

Authors

Allison R. Johnson, University of Western Ontario, Canada
Matthew Thomson, University of Western Ontario, Canada
Jodie Whelan, University of Western Ontario, Canada



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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