Pet Ownership & Related Consumption Practices: the Role of Morality

This paper considers the role of morality in the consumption practices associated with pet ownership. To explore these practices, we adopt Holt’s (1995) Typology of Consumption Practices. A photo-elicitation technique is used to elicit stories from fifteen participants concerning their cats and dogs. Our findings illustrate the complexity of consumption in this arena and highlight a potential opportunity for re-working Holt’s (1995) typology to include an additional metaphor of consuming as morality. The paper concludes with a discussion on the value of our extended framework and highlights the implications for future cultural studies of consumption.



Citation:

Morven McEachern and Fiona Cheetham (2011) ,"Pet Ownership & Related Consumption Practices: the Role of Morality", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 225-230.

Authors

Morven McEachern, Lancaster University, UK
Fiona Cheetham, University of Salford, UK



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Changes in Environment Restore Self-Control

Nicole Mead, University of Melbourne, Australia
Jonathan Levav, Stanford University, USA

Read More

Featured

The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Delay Discounting for Food and Money: A Longitudinal Study

Ratnalekha Venkata Naga Viswanadham, INSEAD, France
Hilke Plassmann, INSEAD, France
Yann Cornil, University of British Columbia, Canada
Pierre Chandon, INSEAD, France

Read More

Featured

Rejecting Moralized Products: Moral Identity as a Predictor of Reactance to “Vegetarian” and “Sustainable” Labels

Rishad Habib, University of British Columbia, Canada
Yann Cornil, University of British Columbia, Canada
Karl Aquino, University of British Columbia, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.