Exploring the Self-Expressive and the Self-Transformative Character of Cherished Possessions Through Stories From Greek Female Consumers

Previous consumer research suggests that key possessions define the self in relationship to other people and extend the self by symbolically expressing the self and/or by transforming the self in a desired form; enabling desired identities. This study examines how differently consumers define the self in relationship to other people through possessions and responds to the calls made for exploration of the relationship between the self-expressive and the self-transformative character of possessions. The findings from the in-depth interviews suggest that the theoretical distinction between self-expressive and self-transformative possessions holds or is transcended depending on the possession’s meaning, which often regards other people.



Citation:

Katerina Karanika and Margaret K. Hogg (2011) ,"Exploring the Self-Expressive and the Self-Transformative Character of Cherished Possessions Through Stories From Greek Female Consumers", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 66-68.

Authors

Katerina Karanika, Lancaster University
Margaret K. Hogg, Lancaster University



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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