What Makes Somewhere the Best Place to Live?

This article aims to analyze how the superiority of a living place is determined. The paper begins by building a conceptual framework of the sense of place. It positions place identity, place uniqueness and place dependency as concepts evolving through reciprocal interaction. The paper explores two empirical questions; first the meaning themes characterizing the best living place are analyzed. Second, the types of reasoning used to justify the superiority of the place are investigated. A dataset gathered in a competition is analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Social, functional and environmental meaning themes form the co-occurring categories of justification. Four types of reasoning is identified; belonging, convenience, distinction and convincing. These findings are discussed alongside those from earlier research.



Citation:

Pirjo Laaksonen, Minna-Maarit Jaskari, Hanna Leipämaa-Leskinen, and Martti Laaksonen (2011) ,"What Makes Somewhere the Best Place to Live?", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 304-309.

Authors

Pirjo Laaksonen, University of Vaasa, Finland
Minna-Maarit Jaskari, University of Vaasa, Finland
Hanna Leipämaa-Leskinen, University of Vaasa, Finland
Martti Laaksonen, University of Vaasa, Finland



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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