Product Series Judgment: Nonconscious Consumption of Parallel Extrinsic Cues

This research examines the psychological avenues in processing extrinsic numerical cues and its verbal counterpart in the context of product series evaluation, which is affected by the mere choice of product labels on a newer generation with the membership being indexed either numerically or verbally. A theoretical model is proposed to account for this “label effect” which posits that numerical labels activate an expectancy mode to unconsciously search outward for information compatible with the expected product specification, while equivalent descriptive labels activate a self-fit mode to unconsciously search inward for incidental goals congruent with the anticipated product experience.



Citation:

Lin Huang (2011) ,"Product Series Judgment: Nonconscious Consumption of Parallel Extrinsic Cues", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 452.

Authors

Lin Huang, University of Michigan, USA



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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