The Influence of Subtle External Cues on Eating Behavior

People eat more when their eating companions eat more and less when their companions eat less. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that this effect is inhibited when participants are exposed to subtle external cues that relate to body weight. The results show that participants who have been exposed to these kinds of cues eat little, even if their confederate eats a lot. Study 3 was conducted in a setting without a confederate and shows that this priming effect is moderated by the motive to monitor one’s own weight.



Citation:

Thomas A. Brunner and Michael Siegrist (2011) ,"The Influence of Subtle External Cues on Eating Behavior", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 482.

Authors

Thomas A. Brunner, ETH Zurich, Institute for Environmental Decisions, Consumer Behavior
Michael Siegrist, ETH Zurich, Institute for Environmental Decisions, Consumer Behavior



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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