Adult Consumers’ Understanding and Use of Information on Food Labels: a Study Among Consumers Living in the Potchefstroom and Klerksdorp Region

A combined cross-sectional and descriptive study, to investigating adult consumers’ understanding and use of the information on food labels in making food choices. Sample included 174 respondents, involved in the purchasing of household food products. Respondents’ understanding of the information revealed an inability to apply food label information to make food choices. Reasons for not using food label information included regarding the “taste and price more important than the nutritional content of the food product”, “experiencing time constraints”, and “lack of education and nutritional knowledge”. Barriers in consumers’ understanding and use of information on food labels are highlighted. Consumer; food label; understanding; use



Citation:

Sunelle A Jacobs, Hanli de Beer, and Ment Larney (2011) ,"Adult Consumers’ Understanding and Use of Information on Food Labels: a Study Among Consumers Living in the Potchefstroom and Klerksdorp Region", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9, eds. Alan Bradshaw, Chris Hackley, and Pauline Maclaran, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 570-571.

Authors

Sunelle A Jacobs, North-West University, South Africa
Hanli de Beer, North-West University, South Africa
Ment Larney, North-West University, South Africa



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 9 | 2011



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