Celebrity Worship Within Affinity Groups: Adopting a Multi-Faceted Perspective

Substantial evidence suggests that celebrity worship pervades contemporary societies (Hills 2002). Recent research suggests that at least one in three people engage in celebrity worship (Maltby, Houran and McCutcheon 2003) and seventy-five percent of young adults report a strong attraction to a celebrity (typically musicians or movie stars) at some point in their lives (Boon and Lomore 2001). A glance at our most popular magazines adds weight to these observations. Images and stories of celebrities appear on most pages. Their front-covers lure readers with ‘fascinating’ questions such as: “Is Britney’s really marriage over? Are Tom and Nicole back together? Will Calista win her fight with anorexia?”



Citation:

Marylouise Caldwell and Paul Henry (2006) ,"Celebrity Worship Within Affinity Groups: Adopting a Multi-Faceted Perspective", in LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 1, eds. Silvia Gonzalez and David Luna, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 106-106.

Authors

Marylouise Caldwell, University of Sydney, Australia
Paul Henry, University of Sydney, Australia



Volume

LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 1 | 2006



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